Wednesday, June 15, 2005



Major Media Endorsed Anti-Semitism
Jews Give Cancer-Juice To Palestinians


From Honest Reporting.com, via Atlas Shrugs:



In the wake of Newsweek's now-retracted Guantanamo Bay Koran toilet abuse story, Palestinian prisoners have floated their own version to the western press.

On June 7, The Scotsman headlined: 'Israeli Soldiers 'Desecrated Koran During Riot''. Reports on this unfounded claim from Israel's Megiddo prison (including these Associated Press and Reuters versions) included a refutation from the Israeli Prisons Authority, but the media-fueled rumors were enough to spark violent protests and public burnings of American and Israeli flags in faraway Muslim communities.

And now, this:



RAMALLAH, June 13 (Xinhuanet) -- Palestinian chief of Environment Authority Yousef Abu Safeya accused Israel Monday of glutting the Palestinian markets with carcinogenic canned juice.

"Such kind of drinks are specifically produced for the Palestinian consumers in the Gaza Strip." Abu Safeya told a weekly session of the Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC).

He pointed out that the Palestinian security services had recently seized a number of shipments, including canned juice containing a carcinogenic substance.

He added that the Egyptian authorities impounded two Israeli trucks carrying child toys polluted with carcinogenic and radioactive substances at the Rafah commercial crossing on the borders with Israel in March.

Abu Safeya also criticized the Palestinian judiciary department for allowing the import of second-hand Israeli commodities, including computer sets and other electric appliance.


Now, let's think about this. You are the Chief of the Palestinian Environmental Authority and you find out that Israeli's are killing your children with cancer juice and radioactive toys. So, you call a press conference and you let the world's media know about it. Oh yes, and you don't forget to complain the glut of Israeli computers and electronic appliances on the Palestinian market.

Does that make any sense? Doesn't that make you wonder what's wrong with our world? We live in an age when Anti-Semitic libels are published in major newspapers around the world. That means editors at newspapers think this is worth printing. They are intelligent enough to know that these things aren't true.

So, what's their motive?

It's bad enough that major government figures in the Palestinian Authority propagate such lies, but then the world's media listens to it, and deems it credible?

How? Really, how? How could anyone deem this to be credible?

If I called a press conference tomorrow and said Kofi Annan was trying to kill me, would that be considered credible enough to print in the newspapers of the world?

Honest Reporting goes on to report:



This rehashing of an ancient anti-Semitic blood libel appeared prominently on GoogleNews.

Throughout the Arafat years, Palestinian spokespersons fed similar items to the western press, such as claims Israel deployed radioactive uranium against Palestinian protestors, and Suha Arafat's accusation in the presence of Hillary Clinton that the IDF made 'extensive use of poisonous gas... which has led to an increase in cancer cases among women and children.'

A
senior Israeli official said the cancer juice case reminds him of 'the same types of lies Yasser Arafat used to spread.' As documented in a JCPA report, those included accusations that Israel disseminated bubble gum that sterilized Palestinian girls and sent AIDS-infected prostitutes to infect Palestinian men.

We understand that Google uses an automated algorithm to filter news search results, but as HR has repeatedly indicated, this system is deeply flawed and lends itself to promulgating such absurd propaganda.

Comments to GoogleNews: news-feedback@google.com

UPDATE: A comment from Behind-the-Scenes:

I'm glad they reported that the P.A is making such allegations. The P.A makes up this propaganda, it's listened to by Palestinians and the world should know what kind of lies the P.A creates and propagates.

It's not that Palestinian allegations, those unfit for consumption outside the Arab world, shouldn't be reported on. It's that the article shouldn't seem to endorse the propaganda and should (in this instance) point out, for example, that he didn't display any of the "radioactive" toys and that the allegations were laughed off by Israeli spokesmen and condemnded.

Yep, Behind the Scenes is correct. Bad writing and thinking on my part. Thanks for the clarification.

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