Tuesday, February 12, 2008


Always
"Never Again"


It's never over, as my friend Epaminondas says:


Wolniewicz exhorted Poles to defend themselves, saying "The Jews are attacking us! We need to defend ourselves." The professor was joined by 91-year-old Bishop Albin Malysiak in his call for Poles to protect their "nearest and dearest". An anti-Semitic professor ranted against "the kikes" Sunday in a rousing speech to an overflow standing room-only crowd of approximately 1,000 people at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Warsaw.


The event, which was heavily promoted in the Polish capital, ended with a question-and-answer period in which participants were strongly urged to "get organized."


No, not 1938, today.


A Jewish woman and her Orthodox son were the victims of an anti-Semitic attack in Melbourne. Ester Weiss, 54, and her son, Sharon, were punched in the head by two youths who hurled anti-Semitic abuse at them. The attack took place in a Jewishly populated area. Weiss said the assailants also threw her son's yarmulke away. Police are seeking the two youths


Last month.


Three attacks in the last two weeks, including a raid on a synagogue and desecration of a memorial to Holocaust victims, were reported by Russia's Jewish community on Thursday.
In Ulyanovsk, a group of about a dozen young men painted swastikas Tuesday on the walls of a synagogue and cursed at members inside, the Federation of Jewish Communities of Russia said.
In Volgograd, anti-Semitic slogans were scrawled on a memorial to Holocaust victims Sunday, the group said.


Last week, several young men burst into a synagogue in Nizhny Novgorod, throwing religious books out a window and beating up a security guard, it said. All three cities are in western Russia.


The federation said it was concerned about the rise in attacks targeting Jews, calling it part of "a recent surge in anti-Semitic manifestations" in Russia.


All this year.

The Caulfield Hebrew Congregation, one of the city's largest synagogues, was daubed with swastikas last weekend. Vandals also painted swastikas on a kosher restaurant, and Melbourne's best-known bagel bakery, Glick's, had its front window smashed, the Australian Jewish News reported Thursday. The police are unwilling to link the vandalism at this stage, however, and have not confirmed that the attack on Glick's, which has suffered several similar attacks in the past six months,was anti-Semitic. Neither the bakery nor the synagogue has closed-circuit TV, although spokespeople for both said they would consider upgrading their security.


This year.


January: Brazilian singer, Nana Caymmi, made blatantly ant-Semitic remarks during a recent interview. Caymmi is one of Brazil's most popular singers, and daughter to Dorival Caymmi, one of the country's foremost composers. In an interview with British publication Queen Magazine, Caymmi was asked about her son's long battle with drug addiction. The singer stated that "it is pure hell. You cannot imagine the drama I live with. I constantly ask myself why I need suffer so. I am not Jewish, I did not crucify Jesus."


Last month.


Two people were wounded in a stone-throwing attack in London on Holocaust Memorial Day, according to British media outlets. The two were part of a tour group visiting former Jewish sites in London's East End. One of the victims suffered a deep cut to her head and was taken to a nearby hospital. Tourists said the perpetrators were four young Muslim members of the area's immigrant community. Local police said they were investigating the incident as a hate crime.


Last month.


A group of youths in central Berlin shouted anti-Semitic slurs and set a dog on five students who were leaving a Jewish school yesterday, according to police. Two main suspects, age 27 and 31, were to appear in court today after police arrested four ``punks'' following the incident, police spokesman Klaus Schubert said. The students, age 15 to 17, were leaving their school on Grosse Hamburger Strasse in Berlin's Mitte district at around 2:45 p.m. local time. As the students approached a nearby corner, the suspects began shouting anti-Semitic words and had a dog chase one of the Jewish students to a local bakery, Schubert said. Witnesses called the police; the students were unhurt.


This month.


Anti-Semites desecrated 24 graves in southern Hungary, the fourth time in the past year that the Kaposvar graveyard has been vandalized. Local Jewish leader Laszlo Rona said that guard dogs may be used to protect the cemetery. Swastikas and arrow-crosses were painted on the tombs, and Stars of David were crossed out with graffiti proclaiming that "our homeland is not to be sold." The same slogan was scrawled on a gravestone in the same cemetery two weeks ago.


January.



  • California: In January, several incidents of anti-Semitic graffiti and swastikas were discovered in the San Fernando Valley.

  • New Jersey: After nearly 500 headstones at the Poile Zedek Cemetery were found toppled and cracked in early January, police initially said anti-Semitism was not being considered as a factor because they hadn't yet identified a motive or a culprit. A few days later, police said they "misspoke." This is the second time this year that the cemetery was attacked. On New Year's Day, 17 stones were found upended at the cemetery, which is used by Congregation Etz Ahaim in Highland Park and Congregation Poile Zedek in New Brunswick.

  • New York: A swastika and an anti-Semitic message were found scrawled on the side door of a Jewish senior center in Midwood. The markings were found in early January on the Brookdale Senior Citizen Center of Agudath Israel at 817 Avenue H. This is the second anti-Semitic graffiti incident in Brooklyn since the new year began. On Tuesday, Jan. 1, similar graffiti was found on a home on 40th Street in Borough Park. Both neighborhoods have some of the highest populations of Holocaust survivors in New York City.


It is never over. Lesson one.


Never.


UPDATE:


Depraved

Belgian Cafe Throws Out American Tourist with Skullcap (IsraelNN.com)


A Belgian restaurant waiter threw out a 64-year-old American professor because he was wearing a skullcap [kipa], according to the European Jewish Press.


"We are not serving Jews; [get] out of here," the waiter shouted at Marcel Kalmann after he entered the Le Paniel D'Or cafe in the city of Bruges


The tourist went to another cafe, where the owners helped him call the police. A Belgian Jewish newspaper reported that Kalmann said he will lodge a complaint against the restaurant owner and against the police for telling him the incident was not anti-Semitic and that he could not file a complaint in English. Kalmann was born in the Auschwitz death camp three days before it was liberated by Allied troops.