Thursday, November 05, 2009

Outrage over wall blocking free U2 Berlin concert

From Yahoo Music News:



Fans hoping to glimpse U2's free concert celebrating 20 years since the Berlin Wall fell were outraged Thursday to find that a 12-foot (3.6-meter) metal barrier was installed to block the view for those without tickets.

Both Berliners and tourists alike saw the irony in building a wall around a concert dedicated to the wall that has already come down.

"It's completely ridiculous that they are blocking the view," said Louis-Pierre Boily, 23, who came to Berlin even though he failed to get U2 tickets. "I thought it's a free show, but MTV probably wants people to watch it on TV to get their ratings up."

Monday, November 02, 2009

Monkeys in mourning


From the New York Post:

Farewell, old friend.

More than a dozen grief-stricken chimpanzees joined in an extraordinary expression of mourning as an elder in their family was laid to rest at a West African animal sanctuary.

Dorothy was in her late 40s, which is well into retirement age for a chimp, when she succumbed to heart failure.

As caregivers at the Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center bore her by wheelbarrow for burial, the typically boisterous apes rushed to the edge of their wired enclosure and fell silent.

They stood -- wrapping arms around one another, resting on each other's shoulder and not making a sound -- as Dorothy's female keeper adjusted her head in preparation for a final farewell.

PAYING RESPECTS: Chimps watch in pained silence as Dorothy, who was in her 40s, is wheeled past them and prepared for burial at a sanctuary in Cameroon. The amazing story is featured in National Geographic.
Monica Szczupider
PAYING RESPECTS: Chimps watch in pained silence as Dorothy, who was in her 40s, is wheeled past them and prepared for burial at a sanctuary in Cameroon. The amazing story is featured in National Geographic.

The remarkable photo, which appears in the November issue of National Geographic magazine, was snapped by Monica Szczupider, who was working at the rescue center in eastern Cameroon.

She said Dorothy was a "prominent figure" among the extended family of about 25 chimps at Sanaga-Yong, and the sanctuary's caregivers made sure the other apes witnessed her last rites.

Get more on this story at NationalGeographic.com

"We brought her by wheelbarrow to let the others see," she told the British newspaper The Sun.

The chimps, united in mourning, remained there as they watched Dorothy's keeper give her a final, loving stroke on her forehead and then lowered her into the ground.

"It was unbelievably emotional. We were all struck," Szczupider, 30, said.